Articulation

Successful speakers articulate distinctly, so listeners can interpret them correctly. They use the tongue, teeth, lips and jaws to produce sounds that are clear and distinct. Some speakers have trouble being understood because they do not form ending consonants distinctly or because they swallow word ending like –ing. Others have difficulty being understood because they fail to articulate sound combinations. Instead of forming both sounds of the combination, they form only one of the sounds. For example, they leave the d in nd or ld or t in ft, st or pt.

Severe articulation problems require the assistance of a communications disorder specialist. However, most articulation problems are created by lack of care on the part of the speaker or by lack of awareness of how sounds should be formed.

During the following exercises you should exaggerate the sounds to help you develop the ability to create them satisfactory. During normal conversation, create sounds clearly and distinctly. Be careful to avoid exaggerating the sounds during normal conversation, since this make people consider your speech affected. Once you have spent speaking time practicing how to form sounds, you will soon find yourself speaking more clearly and distinctly.

You need to have good articulation to help you present your term paper in such a way that all your points can be understood. When you pronounce some words in your term paper wrongly, your whole term paper might mean something else denying you vital marks. You need to work on your articulation and never ignore it.

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